Pacific Computer Wizards - Repository ....

An information repository of … thoughts, data, sharing, and ideas, posted.
    – Use the information in these posts at your own risk.      
                                The ideas, thoughts, and expressions posted here are for my own use.                 
                                 
  -President & Chief Wizard                                                        


Raspberry Pi - Pi-Hole DNS and Ad-Block Protection

posted Feb 3, 2021, 11:50 AM by Andrew Chadick   [ updated ]

A "Raspberry Pi" is a very tiny, but complete, small form factor computer. These devices can be always on servers, it just depends on how you choose to use them.
"Ubuntu" - is an Open Source Linux Operating System - that has both graphical desktop and command line server versions.
"Pi-Hole": Think firewall-like software, that works with your Network and/or WIFI Router to protect your network's DNS and while it's at it, it has an ad-blocker functionality that can protect every computer, tablet, device and phone connected to your Wired and Wireless networks. Pi-Hole is accessed and configured through a web page on your own network.

The community that makes up the Raspberry Pi world, has made installing and configuring these devices a snap to set up and run.

The linux operating system setup is super easy, you just install the Ubuntu Server OS via the ubuntu.com website, select your raspberry pi unit, and run the utility to install it to an SD card.
Once Ubuntu Server is installed to the SD card, insert the SD into your raspberry pi, and boot up; use the credentials "ubuntu" as the user and "ubuntu" as the default password to get in, then configure it with a much better password. Run "sudo apt-get update"  and press enter.  Then when updated, run  "sudo apt-get upgrade"   and press enter.  Type/Select "Y" to upgrade.  
Just run these two commands every month to keep the device up to date.  The update notifications for the Pi-Hole software come from its own web interface. Drop into terminal on your Pi device; The update command is:   pihole -up

Once booted into Ubuntu Server, and your OS is updated, then, using the same terminal interface given to you -- install "Pi-Hole" with one command:
"$ curl -sSL https://install.pi-hole.net | bash"

Just follow the prompts during install. Make sure to use your favorite upstream DNS option. If you are interested, OpenDNS provides an extra layer of security even if you don't choose one of their protection plans,  you can still use it for free. Or, if you don't mind being tracked through the internet, Google DNS is considered one of the most complete, and probably the fastest responding option. 

Then go into your Wi-Fi routers' web configuration page (settings) and tell it to only use the raspberry pi's IP as your DNS as provided to you through this install process. That's the gist of it.  

Your current Wi-Fi router will ping this device each time someone enters a URL or opens some web address. There is nothing on the computer, tablet or phone level to configure.  If the URL matches something on the bad list, it simply won't go there.  If it doesn't find the URL on the list, then it will reach upstream to your choice of DNS.  If the DNS says it's ok, then the page will be sent to your device.

The next thing you will do is sign in to your Pi-Hole web command interface using the onscreen credentials found after the install. Make sure to use the group list(s) identified below as the Ad List/Restricted Domains lists, and after pasting it in, add it to the device with the Update Gravity Option, then click the bar to "Update" so that it uses the downloaded lists.

Source Links:
https://www.raspberrypi.org/products/raspberry-pi-4-model-b/
https://ubuntu.com/raspberry-pi
https://ubuntu.com/tutorials/how-to-install-ubuntu-on-your-raspberry-pi#1-overview
https://pi-hole.net/
https://www.opendns.com/ 



If you use Google WIFI Mesh in your organization/home: Use this article to help configure your setup... Use Option #2 to force the router to use the Raspberry for DHCP and DNS. https://www.mbreviews.com/pi-hole-google-wifi-raspberry-pi/ This article is good for several reasons, just read it, it gives you an idea of how to deal with pointing your services.

Ad List/Restricted Domains List: (with over 600,000 restricted domains). - Very Restrictive List. You may need to add a bunch of exceptions in order to visit some commonly used sites such as social media, and have them work effectively. However; this list is very close to an all-inclusive list. It protects against Adware, Malware, Advertisements, Pop Up Ads, Banners, Malicious sites, Hijacked domains, and some criminal networks, to include some command and control networks. Take this link, add it to your DNS blocking list (AdList), then for regular updates see the Basic List below and add that as a second link to your list. It is updated with changes every week. Both of these links will give you the best in DNS security for this device.
https://github.com/pcwizardsinc/Firewall/raw/main/MasterDomainListThreats.txt

The Basic List / Malicious Sites // Malware List: This is a list that is just the worst of the worst domains listed. It's not for blocking ads and banners, just malicious domains. You can use this list in conjunction with your own lists or others online to augment it. (Updated weekly with new domains).
(This list currently contains just over 3,000 blocked/malicious domains.

Just a few words about this software and the Ad List. This software helps protect your network, by intercepting domain names entered in to browsers, clicked in emails, or accidentally typed and hit enter or Go by mistake. This software will compare what is presented to it, to the list it has on file. If there are no matches, it will go "upstream" to OpenDNS. Open DNS will then respond back with the server IP/or name that is requested, and the computer in your network will go there.
What this device won't do, is stop a computer in your network from going to a specific computer on the internet using an exact IP address. This device is not a full fledged firewall. It's an inexpensive system that gives a layer of protection, and it's very easy to use and configure. It's not going to stop you from wrecking your network if you aren't being careful. It will however help with mistakes, and help by intercepting some things that were accidents.
Also Note: You can "allow" anything that the list blocks. Just run the option to Query the Log, on the far right there is a button that allows you to add something to the block list, or if it's already blocked, you can add it to the allow list.
This list of malicious domains is not all inclusive, it's just a really good source of domains that your machines should not be visiting. however, as with all things, there are exceptions. If you need to make an exception... go in and make it.

CISA - Joint NSA and CISA Guidance on Strengthening Cyber Defense Through Protective DNS

What's my public ipv4 without ads

posted Jan 13, 2021, 8:53 AM by Andrew Chadick

http://ipv4.icanhazip.com/

Abila MIP 2020.1 to 2020.3 install

posted Jan 8, 2021, 7:26 AM by Andrew Chadick

Most Abila MIP upgrades are 2 parts.  There is a server install, and then immediately following, a workstation install.  As of 2020.2, Abila has input a 3rd part, and update tool.  This tool has a known issue, whereby it changes SQL permissions on the database, and causes the program to crash.  This 3rd part of the install is actually optional, and you can cancel out of it.  If you cancel out of it, your install/upgrade of MIP will go smoothly without issue.  However, if you just click through on the update tool portion of the install, it will break your installation and you will need to call Abila support to run manual commands in your SQL console to recover your installation.  

Notes:
Things to have on hand, your customer/software number
Your installation key in case you need to reinstall/restore from backup.
Recent backups.  (in software and SQL databases as a failsafe).

Things you will be forced to do:
Your accounting staff will be required to change their password on an interval, either 90 days(default) or up to 1 year through settings.  The password requirement is 8 digits (1 lower, 1 Caps, 1 number, and NO Symbols).

Monitor Traffic

posted Dec 2, 2020, 4:35 PM by Andrew Chadick   [ updated Dec 2, 2020, 4:59 PM ]

IPTraf
Total, IP, TCP, UDP, ICMP, and non-IP byte counts, LAN station statistics
use: yum iptraf

Speedometer
Is a network bandwidth monitor tool capable of graphically representing network speed.
use: sudo speedometer -r eth0 -t eth0


iftop
iftop is a command-line system monitor that produces a frequently updated list of network connections. By default, the connections are ordered by bandwidth usage, with only the “top” bandwidth consumers shown. Column's can be reordered and sorted by using the options at the bottom of the page.
use: sudo iftop -F eth0   (t=one line per host)  ( n=disable DNS ) (p=Port Display)  Press  S D  or  q=quit  Column Sort 1,2,3


nload
nload is a console application which monitors network traffic and bandwidth usage in real time. It visualizes the in- and outgoing traffic using two graphs and provides additional info like the total amount of transferred data and min/max network usage.
use: sudo nload 

ifstat
ifstat is a simple tool that is fast reports interface statistics.
use: ifstat -a



Wordpress - locate active directory and version

posted Nov 6, 2020, 11:43 AM by Andrew Chadick   [ updated Nov 6, 2020, 11:44 AM ]

find /home/*/public_html/ -type f -iwholename "*/wp-includes/version.php" -exec grep -H "\$wp_version =" {} \;

Google Admin Panel - Prepend [External] warning

posted Nov 3, 2020, 9:01 AM by Andrew Chadick   [ updated Nov 3, 2020, 9:02 AM ]




Pumpkin Spice Latte

posted Nov 3, 2020, 8:11 AM by Andrew Chadick   [ updated Nov 5, 2020, 12:23 PM ]

First: Thank you to Starbucks for posting your ingredients online - it inspired me to do this.

1 can Libby's Pumpkin (organic) approx 30 oz 
2 cans x 14 oz Sweetened Condensed Milk
1/2 cup heavy whipping cream
1/2 cup honey
1/4 white sugar
14 large Tablespoons of brown sugar
4 Tablespoons of Vanilla
1 Teaspoon of Pumpkin Pie Spice
1 Teaspoon of Nutmeg
1 Teaspoon of All Spice
1/2 Teaspoon ground clove
1 Teaspoon Cinnamon

In a large saucepan, over medium heat, pour in the contents of your sweetened condensed milk, add all the sugars, course and liquid, stirring regularly to combine.  When the mixture is smooth and evenly distributed, you can tell when that is...  

Move the contents of the saucepan over to a Vitamix or similar processor.  Add Pumpkin.  Add Whipping Cream and spices.  Blend.  Start slow, then move to medium, as it runs the cavitation will at times stop the overall mixture from combining thoroughly, so gradually increase speed.  Eventually (over a few minutes) you will be at max speed.  The color of the mixture will darken over the minutes that it's being processed.  This is important, because the ingredients if not mixed thoroughly will try to separate.  (If you do stop prematurely and you notice that the ingredients are separating in the dish, just move back to the processor and run for a couple more minutes.)  When done, the mixture should be thick, not runny.  It needs to be spooned and extracted out using a soft baking spatula.  Put the contents in to container like Tupperware, with a sealable lid that can be locked down, and put in the fridge.  

Espresso (2 shots), Steamed Milk (or cheat, and microwave your milk). For a 16 Ounce Coffee Drink.
Make your latte, spoon in 3 heaping teaspoons of the pumpkin mixture, stir well, and enjoy.


Security and Safety - Some light reading

posted Aug 4, 2020, 12:59 PM by Andrew Chadick

• Anti-Defamation League (ADL), ADL Guide to Protecting Your Religious or Communal Institution, 2017, https://www.adl.org/sites/default/files/documents/adlguide-to-protecting-your-religious-or-communal-institution-2017.pdf. 
• ADL, Homepage, 2020, https://www.adl.org. 
• ASIS Houses of Worship Committee, Recommended Best Practices for Securing Houses of Worship Around the World, 2017, https://www.asisonline.org/globalassets/get-involved/councils/documents/best-practices-securing-houses-of-worship.pdf. 
• ASIS International, Auditing Management Systems: Risk, Resilience, Security, and Continuity—Guidance for Application (ANSI/ASIS SPC.2-2014), Alexandria, VA: ASIS International, 2014. 
• Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, Threat Assessment Guide for Houses of Worship, 2004, https://www.hsdl.org/?view&did=447823. 
• City of Fairfax Office of Emergency Management, Model Emergency Operations Plan for Houses of Worship, 2014, http://www.fairfaxva.gov/Home/ShowDocument?id=7314. 
• U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), “Crisis Communications Plan,” January 21, 2016, https://www.ready.gov/business/implementation/crisis. 
• DHS, “Exercises,” undated, https://www.ready.gov/business/testing/exercises. • DHS, Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program (HSEEP), 2020, https://preptoolkit.fema.gov/documents/1269813/1269861/HSEEP_Revision_Apr13_Final.pdf/65bc7843-1d10-47b7-bc0d-45118a4d21da. 
• DHS, “If You See Something, Say Something®,” undated, https://www.dhs.gov/see-something-say-something. • DHS, “Nationwide SAR Initiative (NSI),” undated, https://www.dhs.gov/nsi. 
• DHS, NIPP 2013: Partnering for Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience, 2013, https://www.cisa.gov/sites/default/files/publications/nationalinfrastructure-protection-plan-2013-508.pdf. 
• DHS, Online Suspicious Activity Reporting (SAR) Training for Law Enforcement and Hometown Security Partners, undated, https://www.dhs.gov/nationwide-sarinitiative-nsi/online-sar-training. 
• DHS, “Protective Security Advisors,” undated, https://www.cisa.gov/protective-security-advisors. 
• DHS, Security of Soft Targets and Crowded Places–Resource Guide, April 2019, https://www.cisa.gov/sites/default/files/publications/19_0424_cisa_softtargets-and-crowded-places-resource-guide.pdf. • DHS, “Stop the Bleed,” November 25, 2019, https://www.dhs.gov/stopthebleed. • DHS, “Training,” undated, https://www.ready.gov/business/implementation/training. 
• DHS and DOJ, Bomb Threat Guidance, 2016, https://www.cisa.gov/sites/default/files/publications/dhs-doj-bomb-threat-guidance-brochure-2016-508.pdf. 
• DHS and ISC, Best Practices for Safe Mail Handling, undated, https://www.fbiic.gov/public/2010/nov/safe_Mail_Handling.pdf. 
• DHS, U.S. Department of Education (ED), U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Guide for Developing High-Quality Emergency Operations Plans for Houses of Worship, June 2013, https://www.fema.gov/media-librarydata/20130726-1919-25045-2833/developing_eops_for_houses_of_worship_final.pdf. 
• DHS Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Agency (CISA), “Active Shooter Emergency Action Plan Guide and Template,” undated, https://www.cisa.gov/publication/active-shooter-emergency-action-plan-guide. 
• DHS CISA, “Active Shooter Emergency Action Plan Video,” undated, https://www.cisa.gov/active-shooter-emergency-action-plan-video. 
• DHS CISA, “Active Shooter Preparedness,” undated, https://www.cisa.gov/active-shooter-preparedness. 
• DHS CISA, “Bomb Threat Training Video,” undated, https://www.cisa.gov/what-to-do-bomb-threat. 
• DHS CISA, “Hometown Security,” 2020, https://www.cisa.gov/hometown-security. 
• DHS CISA, “Unattended vs. Suspicious Item Postcard and Poster,” undated, https://www.cisa.gov/publication/unattended-vs-suspicious-item-postcard-and-poster. 
• DHS CISA, “What To Do – Bomb Threat,” undated, https://www.cisa.gov/what-to-do-bomb-threat. 
• DHS Office for Bombing Prevention, “AWR-335 — Response to Suspicious Behaviors and Items for Bombing Prevention (RSBI),” undated, https://cdp.dhs.gov/obp. 
• DHS Office for Bombing Prevention, Bomb Threat Checklist, 2014, https://www.cisa.gov/sites/default/files/publications/dhs-bomb-threat-checklist-2014- 508.pdf.  
• DOJ FBI, FBI Bomb Data Center, General Information Bulleting 2012-1: The Bomb Threat Challenge, undated, http://cdpsdocs.state.co.us/safeschools/Resources/FBI/FBI-BombThreatChallenge-1.pdf. 
• DOJ’s Community Relations Service, https://www.justice.gov/crs, and its program, Protecting Places of Worship, https://www.justice.gov/file/1058496/download. 
• ECCU, Handling Cash: A Common-Sense Approach to Securing Your Ministry’s Most Liquid Asset, undated, https://www.eccu.org/assets/white_paper_pages/22/pdfs.pdf. 
• Faith-Based Information Sharing & Analysis Organization (FB-ISAO), “Services,” 2020, https://faithbased-isao.org/services. 
• FB-ISAO, “Working Groups,” 2020, https://faithbased-isao.org/membership/working-groups. • Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), “HSEEP Policy and Guidance,” undated, https://preptoolkit.fema.gov/web/hseep-resources. 
• FEMA, Developing and Maintaining Emergency Operations Plans, November 2010, https://www.fema.gov/media-library-data/20130726-1828-25045- 0014/cpg_101_comprehensive_preparedness_guide_developing_and_maintaining_emergency_operations_plans_2010.pdf. 
• FEMA, “National Incident Management System,” August 10, 2015, https://training.fema.gov/nims/. 
• FEMA, “Public and Community Safe Rooms,” February 16, 2016, https://www.fema.gov/public-and-community-safe-rooms. 
• FEMA, “You Are the Help Until Help Arrives,” undated, https://community.fema.gov/until-help-arrives. 
• FEMA Emergency Management Institute, “IS-120.C: An Introduction to Exercises,” September 12, 2019, https://training.fema.gov/is/courseoverview.aspx?code=IS-120.c. 
• FEMA Emergency Management Institute, “IS-360: Preparing for Mass Casualty Incidents: A Guide for Schools, Higher Education, and Houses of Worship,” September 12, 2019, https://training.fema.gov/is/courseoverview.aspx?code=IS-360. 
• FEMA Emergency Management Institute, “IS-906 Workplace Security Awareness Training,” September 12, 2019, https://training.fema.gov/emiweb/is/courseoverview.aspx?code=IS-906. 
• Interagency Security Committee (ISC), Facility Security Plan: An Interagency Security Committee Guide, 1st edition, February 2015, https://www.cisa.gov/sites/default/files/publications/ISC-Facility-Security-Plan-Guide-2015-508.pdf. 
• ISC, Planning and Response to an Active Shooter: An Interagency Security Committee Policy and Best Practices Guide, November 2015, https://www.cisa.gov/sites/default/files/publications/isc-planning-response-active-shooter-guide-non-fouo-nov-2015-508.pdf 
• Lockyer, Bill, and Delaine Eastin, Partnering for Safe Schools, undated, https://www.cde.ca.gov/ls/ss/cp/documents/crisisrespbox.pdf.
• National Criminal Justice Reference Service, Safeguarding Houses of Worship toolkit, undated, https://www.justnet.org/resources/Houses_of_Worship.html. 
• National Disaster Interfaith Network, “Disaster Tip Sheets for U.S. Religious Leaders,” 2007, http://www.n-din.org/ndin_resources/ndin_tips_sheets_v1208.php. 
• State of New Jersey Office of Homeland Security and Preparedness, Facility Self-Assessment, January 2019, https://static1.squarespace.com/static/54d79f88e4b0db3478a04405/t/5c3e22af898583ec9bab10ae/1547575983886/Facility+Self+Assessment+Tool+Ja nuary+2019.pdf. 
• State of New Jersey Office of Homeland Security and Preparedness, Role of Security Coordinators, undated, https://static1.squarespace.com/static/54d79f88e4b0db3478a04405/t/5a4d52ee53450af96083504f/1515016942789/Role+of+Security+Coordinators.pd f. 
• Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), “Communications,” May 28, 2019, https://www.samhsa.gov/dtac/dbhiscollections/disaster-response-template-toolkit/communications. 
• SAMHSA, Communicating in a Crisis: Risk Communication Guidelines for Public Officials, 2019, https://store.samhsa.gov/system/files/pep19-01-01-005.pdf. 
• SAMHSA, “Disaster Response Templates: Messaging Through Other Media,” October 21, 2019, https://www.samhsa.gov/dtac/dbhis-collections/disasterresponse-template-toolkit/messaging-through-other-media. 
• United Jewish Communities, Emergency Planning: Disaster and Crisis Response Systems for Jewish Organizations, 2003-2005, http://www.jcrcny.org/wpcontent/uploads/2013/10/EmergencyManual.2.0.pdf. 
• Walsh, T.J., and R.J. Healy, Protection of Assets: Crisis Management, Michael E. Knoke, Ed., Alexandria, VA: ASIS International, 2011. 
• Walsh, T.J., and R.J. Healy, Protection of Assets: Investigation, Michael E. Knoke, Ed., Alexandria, VA: ASIS International, 2011  Security Force/Safety Team 
• ADL, ADL Guide to Protecting Your Religious or Communal Institution, 2017, https://www.adl.org/sites/default/files/documents/adl-guide-to-protecting-yourreligious-or-communal-institution-2017.pdf. 
• ASIS Houses of Worship Committee, Recommended Best Practices for Securing Houses of Worship Around the World, 2017, https://www.asisonline.org/globalassets/get-involved/councils/documents/best-practices-securing-houses-of-worship.pdf. 
• ASIS International, Facilities Physical Security Measures: ASIS GDL FPSM-2009. 
• ASIS International, Protection of Assets: Security Officer Operations, Alexandria, VA: ASIS International, 2011. 
• ASIS International Cultural Properties Council, “Council Resources: Understanding IoT & Hostile Surveillance,” March 7, 2018, https://www.asisonline.org/publications--resources/news/blog/council-resources-understanding-iot--hostile-surveillance/. 
• Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, Threat Assessment Guide for Houses of Worship, 2004, https://www.hsdl.org/?view&did=447823. 
• DHS, “Protect Your Everyday Public Service Announcement,” undated, https://www.dhs.gov/see-something-say-something/campaign-materials/protect-yourevery-day-psa. 
• DHS, “Stop the Bleed,” November 25, 2019, https://www.dhs.gov/stopthebleed. 
• DHS, ED, DOJ, FBI, and HHS, Guide for Developing High-Quality Emergency Operations Plans for Houses of Worship, June 2013, https://www.fema.gov/medialibrary-data/20130726-1919-25045-2833/developing_eops_for_houses_of_worship_final.pdf 
• DHS CISA, “Active Shooter Preparedness,” undated, https://www.cisa.gov/active-shooter-preparedness. • DHS CISA, Houses of Worship: Hometown Security Report Series, May 2017, https://www.cisa.gov/sites/default/files/publications/19_0603_cisa_hsrs-housesof-worship-pscd.pdf. 
• FEMA, “National Incident Management System,” August 10, 2015, https://training.fema.gov/nims/. 
• FEMA, “You Are the Help Until Help Arrives,” undated, https://community.fema.gov/until-help-arrives. 
• FEMA Emergency Management Institute, “IS-360: Preparing for Mass Casualty Incidents: A Guide for Schools, Higher Education, and Houses of Worship,” September 12, 2019, https://training.fema.gov/is/courseoverview.aspx?code=IS-360. 
• FEMA Emergency Management Institute, “IS-906 Workplace Security Awareness Training,” September 12, 2019, https://training.fema.gov/emiweb/is/courseoverview.aspx?code=IS-906. 
• ISC, Planning and Response to an Active Shooter: An Interagency Security Committee Policy and Best Practices Guide, February 2015, https://www.cisa.gov/sites/default/files/publications/isc-planning-response-active-shooter-guide-non-fouo-nov-2015-508.pdf. 
• McLamb, Jennie-Leigh, Keeping Religious Institutions Secure, Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann 2015. 
• Knoke, Michael E., Physical Security Principles, Alexandria, VA: ASIS International, 2015. 
• National Disaster Interfaiths Network, Active Shooter in a House of Worship, undated, http://www.ndin.org/ndin_resources/tipsheets_v1208/07_NDIN_TS_ActiveShooter.pdf. 
• Norman, Thomas L., Risk Analysis and Security Countermeasure Selection, Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 2010. 
• Secure Community Network, Firearms and the Faithful: Approaches to Armed Security in Jewish Communities, January 2020, https://cdn.fedweb.org/fed91/2/FirearmsandtheFaithful%255B2%255D%25281%2529.pdf. Perimeter Security/Delineation 
• ASIS Houses of Worship Committee, Recommended Best Practices for Securing Houses of Worship Around the World, 2017, https://www.asisonline.org/globalassets/get-involved/councils/documents/best-practices-securing-houses-of-worship.pdf. 
• ASIS International, Facilities Physical Security Measures: ASIS GDL FPSM-2009. 
• Chain Link Fence Manufacturers Institute, “Chain Link Fence Manufacturers Institute Security Fencing Recommendations,” 2017, https://chainlinkinfo.org/security-fencing-guidelines/. 
• Crowe, Timothy D., Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design, 3rd edition, Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann, 2013. 
• U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Office of Policy Development and Research, Creating Defensible Space, April 1996, https://www.huduser.gov/publications/pdf/def.pdf. 
• DHS, Site and Urban Design for Security: Guidance against Potential Terrorist Attacks (FEMA-430), December 2007, https://www.fema.gov/media-librarydata/20130726-1624-20490-9648/fema430.pdf. 
• Knoke, Michael E., Physical Security Principles, Alexandria, VA: ASIS International, 2015. Parking and Barriers 
• ASIS Houses of Worship Committee, Recommended Best Practices for Securing Houses of Worship Around the World, 2017, https://www.asisonline.org/globalassets/get-involved/councils/documents/best-practices-securing-houses-of-worship.pdf. 
• ASIS International, Facilities Physical Security Measures: ASIS GDL FPSM-2009. 
• ASIS International Cultural Properties Council, “Council Resources: Understanding IoT & Hostile Surveillance,” March 7, 2018, https://www.asisonline.org/publications--resources/news/blog/council-resources-understanding-iot--hostile-surveillance/. 
• DHS, Building and Infrastructure Protection: Series Reference Manual to Mitigate Potential Terrorist Attacks Against Buildings (FEMA 426/BIPS-06), 2nd edition, October 2011, https://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/st/st-bips-06.pdf. 
• DHS, Site and Urban Design for Security: Guidance against Potential Terrorist Attacks (FEMA-430), December 2007, https://www.fema.gov/media-librarydata/20130726-1624-20490-9648/fema430.pdf. 
• Knoke, Michael E., Physical Security Principles, Alexandria, VA: ASIS International, 2015. Access Control/Entry Control 
• ASIS Houses of Worship Committee, Recommended Best Practices for Securing Houses of Worship Around the World, 2017, https://www.asisonline.org/globalassets/get-involved/councils/documents/best-practices-securing-houses-of-worship.pdf. 
• Hestermann, Jennifer, Soft Target Hardening: Protecting People From Attack, 2nd edition, New York: Routledge, 2018. 
• InstaKey Security Systems, “6 Key Control Program Best Practices,” 2019, http://info.instakey.com/accessintelligence/6-key-control-program-best-practices. 
• ISC, Facility Security Plan: An Interagency Security Committee Guide, 1st edition, February 2015, https://www.cisa.gov/sites/default/files/publications/ISCFacility-Security-Plan-Guide-2015-508.pdf. 
• Ratliff, Paula l., Crime Prevention for Houses of Worship, 2nd edition, ASIS International, ISBN 978-1-934904-74-9. Closed-circuit Video/Video Surveillance Systems 
• ASIS Houses of Worship Committee, Recommended Best Practices for Securing Houses of Worship Around the World, 2017, https://www.asisonline.org/globalassets/get-involved/councils/documents/best-practices-securing-houses-of-worship.pdf. 
• ASIS International, Protection of Assets: Physical Security, Alexandria, VA: ASIS International, 2012. 
• DHS, Buildings and Infrastructure Protection Series: Primer to Design Safe School Projects in Case of Terrorist Attacks and School Shootings (FEMA-428/BIPS07), January 2012, https://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/st/bips07_428_schools.pdf. 
• DHS, CCTV Technology Handbook, July 2013, https://www.dhs.gov/sites/default/files/publications/CCTV-Tech-HBK_0713-508.pdf. 
• Garcia, Mary Lynn, The Design and Evaluation of Physical Protection Systems, 2nd edition, Burlington, MA: Elsevier, 2008. 
• Garcia, Mary Lynn, Vulnerability Assessment of Physical Protection Systems, Burlington, MA: Elsevier, 2006. 
• Hestermann, Jennifer, Soft Target Hardening: Protecting People From Attack, 2nd edition, New York: Routledge, 2018. 
• Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, A Comprehensive Report on School Safety Technology, prepared for DOJ National Institute of Justice, October 2016, https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/grants/250274.pdf. 
• Patterson, David G., Implementing Physical Protection Systems: A Practical Guide, Alexandria, VA: ASIS International, 2013.

Sidecar

posted Jul 30, 2020, 10:24 PM by Andrew Chadick   [ updated Aug 4, 2020, 1:26 PM ]

Suzuki Volusia VL800 with Dnepr MT10 Sidecar (outfitted with some Ural accessories)
800cc Engine, one wheel drive, 5 speed transmission. 


Grub Boot Loader

posted Jul 30, 2020, 9:31 PM by Andrew Chadick   [ updated Jul 30, 2020, 9:33 PM ]

SUDO PICO  /etc/default/grub
Locate and change GRUB_DEFAULT=0  
Change to 2,3,4 depending on how many entries are in your boot loader.

Typical Linux is line 0, then a Memory Test is Line 1, then Windows is Line 2.  So if you want Windows, set it:
GRUB_DEFAULT=2

Then Press and Hold   CNTRL and then press X
When it asks to save, press Y and press Enter.

When back to command line, type:   SUDO Update-Grub and press enter.  Then SUDO Halt -P  to shutdown.  Then test your handy work.



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