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Security and Safety - Some light reading

posted Aug 4, 2020, 12:59 PM by Andrew Chadick

• Anti-Defamation League (ADL), ADL Guide to Protecting Your Religious or Communal Institution, 2017, https://www.adl.org/sites/default/files/documents/adlguide-to-protecting-your-religious-or-communal-institution-2017.pdf. 
• ADL, Homepage, 2020, https://www.adl.org. 
• ASIS Houses of Worship Committee, Recommended Best Practices for Securing Houses of Worship Around the World, 2017, https://www.asisonline.org/globalassets/get-involved/councils/documents/best-practices-securing-houses-of-worship.pdf. 
• ASIS International, Auditing Management Systems: Risk, Resilience, Security, and Continuity—Guidance for Application (ANSI/ASIS SPC.2-2014), Alexandria, VA: ASIS International, 2014. 
• Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, Threat Assessment Guide for Houses of Worship, 2004, https://www.hsdl.org/?view&did=447823. 
• City of Fairfax Office of Emergency Management, Model Emergency Operations Plan for Houses of Worship, 2014, http://www.fairfaxva.gov/Home/ShowDocument?id=7314. 
• U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), “Crisis Communications Plan,” January 21, 2016, https://www.ready.gov/business/implementation/crisis. 
• DHS, “Exercises,” undated, https://www.ready.gov/business/testing/exercises. • DHS, Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program (HSEEP), 2020, https://preptoolkit.fema.gov/documents/1269813/1269861/HSEEP_Revision_Apr13_Final.pdf/65bc7843-1d10-47b7-bc0d-45118a4d21da. 
• DHS, “If You See Something, Say Something®,” undated, https://www.dhs.gov/see-something-say-something. • DHS, “Nationwide SAR Initiative (NSI),” undated, https://www.dhs.gov/nsi. 
• DHS, NIPP 2013: Partnering for Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience, 2013, https://www.cisa.gov/sites/default/files/publications/nationalinfrastructure-protection-plan-2013-508.pdf. 
• DHS, Online Suspicious Activity Reporting (SAR) Training for Law Enforcement and Hometown Security Partners, undated, https://www.dhs.gov/nationwide-sarinitiative-nsi/online-sar-training. 
• DHS, “Protective Security Advisors,” undated, https://www.cisa.gov/protective-security-advisors. 
• DHS, Security of Soft Targets and Crowded Places–Resource Guide, April 2019, https://www.cisa.gov/sites/default/files/publications/19_0424_cisa_softtargets-and-crowded-places-resource-guide.pdf. • DHS, “Stop the Bleed,” November 25, 2019, https://www.dhs.gov/stopthebleed. • DHS, “Training,” undated, https://www.ready.gov/business/implementation/training. 
• DHS and DOJ, Bomb Threat Guidance, 2016, https://www.cisa.gov/sites/default/files/publications/dhs-doj-bomb-threat-guidance-brochure-2016-508.pdf. 
• DHS and ISC, Best Practices for Safe Mail Handling, undated, https://www.fbiic.gov/public/2010/nov/safe_Mail_Handling.pdf. 
• DHS, U.S. Department of Education (ED), U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Guide for Developing High-Quality Emergency Operations Plans for Houses of Worship, June 2013, https://www.fema.gov/media-librarydata/20130726-1919-25045-2833/developing_eops_for_houses_of_worship_final.pdf. 
• DHS Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Agency (CISA), “Active Shooter Emergency Action Plan Guide and Template,” undated, https://www.cisa.gov/publication/active-shooter-emergency-action-plan-guide. 
• DHS CISA, “Active Shooter Emergency Action Plan Video,” undated, https://www.cisa.gov/active-shooter-emergency-action-plan-video. 
• DHS CISA, “Active Shooter Preparedness,” undated, https://www.cisa.gov/active-shooter-preparedness. 
• DHS CISA, “Bomb Threat Training Video,” undated, https://www.cisa.gov/what-to-do-bomb-threat. 
• DHS CISA, “Hometown Security,” 2020, https://www.cisa.gov/hometown-security. 
• DHS CISA, “Unattended vs. Suspicious Item Postcard and Poster,” undated, https://www.cisa.gov/publication/unattended-vs-suspicious-item-postcard-and-poster. 
• DHS CISA, “What To Do – Bomb Threat,” undated, https://www.cisa.gov/what-to-do-bomb-threat. 
• DHS Office for Bombing Prevention, “AWR-335 — Response to Suspicious Behaviors and Items for Bombing Prevention (RSBI),” undated, https://cdp.dhs.gov/obp. 
• DHS Office for Bombing Prevention, Bomb Threat Checklist, 2014, https://www.cisa.gov/sites/default/files/publications/dhs-bomb-threat-checklist-2014- 508.pdf.  
• DOJ FBI, FBI Bomb Data Center, General Information Bulleting 2012-1: The Bomb Threat Challenge, undated, http://cdpsdocs.state.co.us/safeschools/Resources/FBI/FBI-BombThreatChallenge-1.pdf. 
• DOJ’s Community Relations Service, https://www.justice.gov/crs, and its program, Protecting Places of Worship, https://www.justice.gov/file/1058496/download. 
• ECCU, Handling Cash: A Common-Sense Approach to Securing Your Ministry’s Most Liquid Asset, undated, https://www.eccu.org/assets/white_paper_pages/22/pdfs.pdf. 
• Faith-Based Information Sharing & Analysis Organization (FB-ISAO), “Services,” 2020, https://faithbased-isao.org/services. 
• FB-ISAO, “Working Groups,” 2020, https://faithbased-isao.org/membership/working-groups. • Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), “HSEEP Policy and Guidance,” undated, https://preptoolkit.fema.gov/web/hseep-resources. 
• FEMA, Developing and Maintaining Emergency Operations Plans, November 2010, https://www.fema.gov/media-library-data/20130726-1828-25045- 0014/cpg_101_comprehensive_preparedness_guide_developing_and_maintaining_emergency_operations_plans_2010.pdf. 
• FEMA, “National Incident Management System,” August 10, 2015, https://training.fema.gov/nims/. 
• FEMA, “Public and Community Safe Rooms,” February 16, 2016, https://www.fema.gov/public-and-community-safe-rooms. 
• FEMA, “You Are the Help Until Help Arrives,” undated, https://community.fema.gov/until-help-arrives. 
• FEMA Emergency Management Institute, “IS-120.C: An Introduction to Exercises,” September 12, 2019, https://training.fema.gov/is/courseoverview.aspx?code=IS-120.c. 
• FEMA Emergency Management Institute, “IS-360: Preparing for Mass Casualty Incidents: A Guide for Schools, Higher Education, and Houses of Worship,” September 12, 2019, https://training.fema.gov/is/courseoverview.aspx?code=IS-360. 
• FEMA Emergency Management Institute, “IS-906 Workplace Security Awareness Training,” September 12, 2019, https://training.fema.gov/emiweb/is/courseoverview.aspx?code=IS-906. 
• Interagency Security Committee (ISC), Facility Security Plan: An Interagency Security Committee Guide, 1st edition, February 2015, https://www.cisa.gov/sites/default/files/publications/ISC-Facility-Security-Plan-Guide-2015-508.pdf. 
• ISC, Planning and Response to an Active Shooter: An Interagency Security Committee Policy and Best Practices Guide, November 2015, https://www.cisa.gov/sites/default/files/publications/isc-planning-response-active-shooter-guide-non-fouo-nov-2015-508.pdf 
• Lockyer, Bill, and Delaine Eastin, Partnering for Safe Schools, undated, https://www.cde.ca.gov/ls/ss/cp/documents/crisisrespbox.pdf.
• National Criminal Justice Reference Service, Safeguarding Houses of Worship toolkit, undated, https://www.justnet.org/resources/Houses_of_Worship.html. 
• National Disaster Interfaith Network, “Disaster Tip Sheets for U.S. Religious Leaders,” 2007, http://www.n-din.org/ndin_resources/ndin_tips_sheets_v1208.php. 
• State of New Jersey Office of Homeland Security and Preparedness, Facility Self-Assessment, January 2019, https://static1.squarespace.com/static/54d79f88e4b0db3478a04405/t/5c3e22af898583ec9bab10ae/1547575983886/Facility+Self+Assessment+Tool+Ja nuary+2019.pdf. 
• State of New Jersey Office of Homeland Security and Preparedness, Role of Security Coordinators, undated, https://static1.squarespace.com/static/54d79f88e4b0db3478a04405/t/5a4d52ee53450af96083504f/1515016942789/Role+of+Security+Coordinators.pd f. 
• Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), “Communications,” May 28, 2019, https://www.samhsa.gov/dtac/dbhiscollections/disaster-response-template-toolkit/communications. 
• SAMHSA, Communicating in a Crisis: Risk Communication Guidelines for Public Officials, 2019, https://store.samhsa.gov/system/files/pep19-01-01-005.pdf. 
• SAMHSA, “Disaster Response Templates: Messaging Through Other Media,” October 21, 2019, https://www.samhsa.gov/dtac/dbhis-collections/disasterresponse-template-toolkit/messaging-through-other-media. 
• United Jewish Communities, Emergency Planning: Disaster and Crisis Response Systems for Jewish Organizations, 2003-2005, http://www.jcrcny.org/wpcontent/uploads/2013/10/EmergencyManual.2.0.pdf. 
• Walsh, T.J., and R.J. Healy, Protection of Assets: Crisis Management, Michael E. Knoke, Ed., Alexandria, VA: ASIS International, 2011. 
• Walsh, T.J., and R.J. Healy, Protection of Assets: Investigation, Michael E. Knoke, Ed., Alexandria, VA: ASIS International, 2011  Security Force/Safety Team 
• ADL, ADL Guide to Protecting Your Religious or Communal Institution, 2017, https://www.adl.org/sites/default/files/documents/adl-guide-to-protecting-yourreligious-or-communal-institution-2017.pdf. 
• ASIS Houses of Worship Committee, Recommended Best Practices for Securing Houses of Worship Around the World, 2017, https://www.asisonline.org/globalassets/get-involved/councils/documents/best-practices-securing-houses-of-worship.pdf. 
• ASIS International, Facilities Physical Security Measures: ASIS GDL FPSM-2009. 
• ASIS International, Protection of Assets: Security Officer Operations, Alexandria, VA: ASIS International, 2011. 
• ASIS International Cultural Properties Council, “Council Resources: Understanding IoT & Hostile Surveillance,” March 7, 2018, https://www.asisonline.org/publications--resources/news/blog/council-resources-understanding-iot--hostile-surveillance/. 
• Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, Threat Assessment Guide for Houses of Worship, 2004, https://www.hsdl.org/?view&did=447823. 
• DHS, “Protect Your Everyday Public Service Announcement,” undated, https://www.dhs.gov/see-something-say-something/campaign-materials/protect-yourevery-day-psa. 
• DHS, “Stop the Bleed,” November 25, 2019, https://www.dhs.gov/stopthebleed. 
• DHS, ED, DOJ, FBI, and HHS, Guide for Developing High-Quality Emergency Operations Plans for Houses of Worship, June 2013, https://www.fema.gov/medialibrary-data/20130726-1919-25045-2833/developing_eops_for_houses_of_worship_final.pdf 
• DHS CISA, “Active Shooter Preparedness,” undated, https://www.cisa.gov/active-shooter-preparedness. • DHS CISA, Houses of Worship: Hometown Security Report Series, May 2017, https://www.cisa.gov/sites/default/files/publications/19_0603_cisa_hsrs-housesof-worship-pscd.pdf. 
• FEMA, “National Incident Management System,” August 10, 2015, https://training.fema.gov/nims/. 
• FEMA, “You Are the Help Until Help Arrives,” undated, https://community.fema.gov/until-help-arrives. 
• FEMA Emergency Management Institute, “IS-360: Preparing for Mass Casualty Incidents: A Guide for Schools, Higher Education, and Houses of Worship,” September 12, 2019, https://training.fema.gov/is/courseoverview.aspx?code=IS-360. 
• FEMA Emergency Management Institute, “IS-906 Workplace Security Awareness Training,” September 12, 2019, https://training.fema.gov/emiweb/is/courseoverview.aspx?code=IS-906. 
• ISC, Planning and Response to an Active Shooter: An Interagency Security Committee Policy and Best Practices Guide, February 2015, https://www.cisa.gov/sites/default/files/publications/isc-planning-response-active-shooter-guide-non-fouo-nov-2015-508.pdf. 
• McLamb, Jennie-Leigh, Keeping Religious Institutions Secure, Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann 2015. 
• Knoke, Michael E., Physical Security Principles, Alexandria, VA: ASIS International, 2015. 
• National Disaster Interfaiths Network, Active Shooter in a House of Worship, undated, http://www.ndin.org/ndin_resources/tipsheets_v1208/07_NDIN_TS_ActiveShooter.pdf. 
• Norman, Thomas L., Risk Analysis and Security Countermeasure Selection, Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 2010. 
• Secure Community Network, Firearms and the Faithful: Approaches to Armed Security in Jewish Communities, January 2020, https://cdn.fedweb.org/fed91/2/FirearmsandtheFaithful%255B2%255D%25281%2529.pdf. Perimeter Security/Delineation 
• ASIS Houses of Worship Committee, Recommended Best Practices for Securing Houses of Worship Around the World, 2017, https://www.asisonline.org/globalassets/get-involved/councils/documents/best-practices-securing-houses-of-worship.pdf. 
• ASIS International, Facilities Physical Security Measures: ASIS GDL FPSM-2009. 
• Chain Link Fence Manufacturers Institute, “Chain Link Fence Manufacturers Institute Security Fencing Recommendations,” 2017, https://chainlinkinfo.org/security-fencing-guidelines/. 
• Crowe, Timothy D., Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design, 3rd edition, Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann, 2013. 
• U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Office of Policy Development and Research, Creating Defensible Space, April 1996, https://www.huduser.gov/publications/pdf/def.pdf. 
• DHS, Site and Urban Design for Security: Guidance against Potential Terrorist Attacks (FEMA-430), December 2007, https://www.fema.gov/media-librarydata/20130726-1624-20490-9648/fema430.pdf. 
• Knoke, Michael E., Physical Security Principles, Alexandria, VA: ASIS International, 2015. Parking and Barriers 
• ASIS Houses of Worship Committee, Recommended Best Practices for Securing Houses of Worship Around the World, 2017, https://www.asisonline.org/globalassets/get-involved/councils/documents/best-practices-securing-houses-of-worship.pdf. 
• ASIS International, Facilities Physical Security Measures: ASIS GDL FPSM-2009. 
• ASIS International Cultural Properties Council, “Council Resources: Understanding IoT & Hostile Surveillance,” March 7, 2018, https://www.asisonline.org/publications--resources/news/blog/council-resources-understanding-iot--hostile-surveillance/. 
• DHS, Building and Infrastructure Protection: Series Reference Manual to Mitigate Potential Terrorist Attacks Against Buildings (FEMA 426/BIPS-06), 2nd edition, October 2011, https://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/st/st-bips-06.pdf. 
• DHS, Site and Urban Design for Security: Guidance against Potential Terrorist Attacks (FEMA-430), December 2007, https://www.fema.gov/media-librarydata/20130726-1624-20490-9648/fema430.pdf. 
• Knoke, Michael E., Physical Security Principles, Alexandria, VA: ASIS International, 2015. Access Control/Entry Control 
• ASIS Houses of Worship Committee, Recommended Best Practices for Securing Houses of Worship Around the World, 2017, https://www.asisonline.org/globalassets/get-involved/councils/documents/best-practices-securing-houses-of-worship.pdf. 
• Hestermann, Jennifer, Soft Target Hardening: Protecting People From Attack, 2nd edition, New York: Routledge, 2018. 
• InstaKey Security Systems, “6 Key Control Program Best Practices,” 2019, http://info.instakey.com/accessintelligence/6-key-control-program-best-practices. 
• ISC, Facility Security Plan: An Interagency Security Committee Guide, 1st edition, February 2015, https://www.cisa.gov/sites/default/files/publications/ISCFacility-Security-Plan-Guide-2015-508.pdf. 
• Ratliff, Paula l., Crime Prevention for Houses of Worship, 2nd edition, ASIS International, ISBN 978-1-934904-74-9. Closed-circuit Video/Video Surveillance Systems 
• ASIS Houses of Worship Committee, Recommended Best Practices for Securing Houses of Worship Around the World, 2017, https://www.asisonline.org/globalassets/get-involved/councils/documents/best-practices-securing-houses-of-worship.pdf. 
• ASIS International, Protection of Assets: Physical Security, Alexandria, VA: ASIS International, 2012. 
• DHS, Buildings and Infrastructure Protection Series: Primer to Design Safe School Projects in Case of Terrorist Attacks and School Shootings (FEMA-428/BIPS07), January 2012, https://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/st/bips07_428_schools.pdf. 
• DHS, CCTV Technology Handbook, July 2013, https://www.dhs.gov/sites/default/files/publications/CCTV-Tech-HBK_0713-508.pdf. 
• Garcia, Mary Lynn, The Design and Evaluation of Physical Protection Systems, 2nd edition, Burlington, MA: Elsevier, 2008. 
• Garcia, Mary Lynn, Vulnerability Assessment of Physical Protection Systems, Burlington, MA: Elsevier, 2006. 
• Hestermann, Jennifer, Soft Target Hardening: Protecting People From Attack, 2nd edition, New York: Routledge, 2018. 
• Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, A Comprehensive Report on School Safety Technology, prepared for DOJ National Institute of Justice, October 2016, https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/grants/250274.pdf. 
• Patterson, David G., Implementing Physical Protection Systems: A Practical Guide, Alexandria, VA: ASIS International, 2013.

Sidecar

posted Jul 30, 2020, 10:24 PM by Andrew Chadick   [ updated Aug 4, 2020, 1:26 PM ]

Suzuki Volusia VL800 with Dnepr MT10 Sidecar (outfitted with some Ural accessories)
800cc Engine, one wheel drive, 5 speed transmission. 


Grub Boot Loader

posted Jul 30, 2020, 9:31 PM by Andrew Chadick   [ updated Jul 30, 2020, 9:33 PM ]

SUDO PICO  /etc/default/grub
Locate and change GRUB_DEFAULT=0  
Change to 2,3,4 depending on how many entries are in your boot loader.

Typical Linux is line 0, then a Memory Test is Line 1, then Windows is Line 2.  So if you want Windows, set it:
GRUB_DEFAULT=2

Then Press and Hold   CNTRL and then press X
When it asks to save, press Y and press Enter.

When back to command line, type:   SUDO Update-Grub and press enter.  Then SUDO Halt -P  to shutdown.  Then test your handy work.



Using an RMM and PowerShell to Set a static IP

posted Apr 8, 2020, 4:44 PM by Andrew Chadick   [ updated Apr 8, 2020, 4:48 PM ]

New-NetIPAddress –IPAddress 10.1.1.181 -DefaultGateway 10.1.1.1 -PrefixLength 24 -InterfaceIndex (Get-NetAdapter).InterfaceIndex

Notes:
.180 - .198 Only Act Use
.219 for routing.

Google takes on Active Directory

posted Jan 17, 2020, 6:19 AM by Andrew Chadick   [ updated Feb 18, 2020, 7:06 AM ]


Manage Windows 10 devices through the G Suite Admin console

Posted: 16 Jan 2020 01:45 PM PST

What’s changing 

We’re enabling enhanced desktop security for Windows with a new beta. This will allow you to manage and secure Windows 10 devices through the Admin console, just as you do for Android, iOS, Chrome, and Jamboard devices today. It will also enable SSO so users can more easily access G Suite and other SSO-enabled applications on Windows 10 devices.

With these new controls G Suite admins can:

  • Enable their organization to use existing G Suite account credentials to login to Windows 10 devices, and easily access apps and services with SSO 
  • Protect user accounts with anti-phishing, anti-hijacking, and suspicious login detection technologies 
  • Ensure that all Windows 10 devices used to access G Suite are updated, secure, and within compliance 
  • Perform admin actions, such as wiping a device and pushing device configuration updates, to Windows 10 devices from the cloud without specific network requirements

Sign up for the Beta on this:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdLbvZapaaNG8ICmmu0dkSJCazmmtfZ1eaoi_XAP-z-y7rYYw/viewform

Manually Download Latest Win 10

posted Dec 12, 2019, 12:42 PM by Andrew Chadick

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10

Windows Update (via PowerShell command line)

posted Dec 3, 2019, 6:53 AM by Andrew Chadick   [ updated Dec 3, 2019, 6:59 AM ]


Install-Module PSWindowsUpdate
Set-ExecutionPolicy -ExecutionPolicy Unrestricted
Import-Module PSWindowsUpdate
Get-WindowsUpdate
Install-WindowsUpdate


usoclient.exe  /StartScan, /StartDownload, /StartInstall
startdownload               (download updates)
startinstall                    (install updates)
Refreshsettings             (Refresh settings if any changes were made)
StartInteractiveScan      (Open a dialog and start scanning for updates)
RestartDevice                (Restart computer to finish installing updates)
ScanInstallWait              (Scan, Download, and install updates)
ResumeUpdate               (Resume installing updates on next boot)

Thanksgiving - Turkey

posted Nov 12, 2019, 11:02 AM by Andrew Chadick   [ updated Nov 30, 2019, 6:19 PM ]


Read through, don't follow like a traditional recipe -

Prep - 24 hours before - Start the Brine process. 

I generally go for a 20-ish pound bird or larger... 26 is my target size -make sure it's completely prepped, neck removed, organs removed. (save these for gravy). Make sure feathers are completely removed. 
You need to make this an all day project, you are going to be at the stove on and off for roughly 7 hours. Give yourself time, and when the bird comes out of the oven, let it rest for half an hour at least before carving it.

Day of, remove from Brine, rinse bird thoroughly inside and out.  

Peel bag of baking potatoes, and halve-them at an angle.  Place in  a butter greased turkey pan - lining the bottom of the pan. Then drizzle olive oil lightly over the tops of the raw peeled potatoes.

Make your stuffing - I do mine completely by sight and texture.   Bread crumbs, chicken broth, celery, carrots, onion, mushrooms, sausage, and green apple.
The Stuffing is made of dried bread crumbs, about 8 ounces of chicken broth (added to lightly moisten the bread crumbs -not to soak them wet). In a pan, place the sliced mushrooms, peeled and diced onion and saute with diced celery and shredded carrots until onion is translucent, add the cooked and crumbled seasoned and savory game sausage, and then the peeled and diced green apple.  Combine in a large bowl.  
When stuffing the bird, pack the stuffing in tightly at first and then looser as you approach the opening, you want the top to look loose and fluffy.  If there is leftover stuffing, put in a glass Pyrex dish to cook separately, or another day.
Note about sausage, make sure it's a flavor you like before using it in stuffing.  The complex flavor of the sausage will color the stuffing.  This stuffing is a meal unto itself.

Take the turkey and completely heavy dust coat the bird with bread flour while it's still damp from its rinse.  
(Flour should be adhered thoroughly on all surfaces.)

Stuff the bird, both cavities.  You can use toothpicks to hold the neck flap in place while rotating the bird if needed.
Place bird on top of the roasting pan lined with potatoes. (potatoes are there to lift the bird off the bottom, and give roasted goodness to serve with the bird).
Salt and Pepper the top outside of the bird, making sure to get the breast, legs, and wings with dry seasoning ingredients. 

Pre-heat the oven to 425 degrees. Place bird in the oven, uncovered for 35 minutes at 425.

At 35 minutes lower the temperature to 325 and cover with a loose sheet of foil.
At every hour mark from here on in, baste.  Cook until internal temperature of bird reaches at least 165 degrees but no more than 170.
 
Should look something like this when ready.

For the turkey gravy, I put the neck, and internal organs in to a saucepan with 4 cups of water.  I put the burner on roughly medium-ish, and just let it simmer along for the course of the day while the bird is cooking. I add water as needed to keep it at that 4 cup level, trying to keep it about the same because of evaporation.  Prior to pulling the bird out of the oven, you can get a feel for that as you check the temperature, turn the burner up to high and bring the water to a boil.  Scoop out the organs and turkey neck and if you don't want to consume them(just toss them away). Add 1/2 cup of butter. Add a little flour and cornstarch (about equal parts 2 tablespoons of each) to the boiling water and whisk until thick, turn to medium and keep stirring slowly for about 15 minutes, then turn to lowest setting and keep warm until ready to serve.  Note: do not use the drippings from the turkey pan, they will be too salty.

Cranberry sauce - 
1/2 cup fresh squeezed orange juice
1/2 cup water
1 cup sugar
12 ounces of fresh cranberries
Zest of the orange, somewhere in the line of 2 teaspoons worth
and a pinch of kosher salt

Bring the orange juice, water, cranberries, and sugar to a boil in a saucepan, stir until the sugar is fully absorbed and the cranberries are mush.  Turn the temperature to low and add the rest of the ingredients, zest of the orange and a pinch of salt.  Let cook for about 20 minutes more, then turn off burner and let it cool.  


Waldorf Salad -
6 Tbsp mayonnaise 
1 Tbsp lemon juice
1/3 cup of flaked Parmesan cheese
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon honey
fresh ground black pepper 1/2 teaspoon
2 honey crisp apples, peeled, cored and chopped
1 cup red seedless grapes, sliced in half 
1/4 cup of raisins
1 cup celery, thinly sliced
1 cup chopped, lightly toasted walnuts
Romaine hearts Lettuce - chopped
Combine in a large bowl and toss together.





BBQ Sauce that Bites back!

posted Nov 12, 2019, 9:19 AM by Andrew Chadick   [ updated Nov 12, 2019, 9:31 AM ]

                ¼ cup ketchup

                ¼ hoisin sauce

                2 Tablespoons lemon juice

                2 Tablespoons sugar

                2 cloves garlic, minced

                1 Tablespoon Siracha, Tabasco, or Louisiana hot sauce (At least this amount,... to taste.)

                1 teaspoon habanero chile hot sauce

                ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon

                ¼ teaspoon ground allspice.


-Credit to Alyssa B. for this brilliant creation.

Newest Build - Version 1903 - breaking the Start Menu

posted Oct 25, 2019, 6:31 AM by Andrew Chadick   [ updated Jan 7, 2020, 6:29 AM ]

Once again, Microsoft released an update that broke the start menu.  It's the same deal as my 2016 posts on this topic. At least the fix is pretty straightforward, and not difficult to do.  It's just time consuming and a pain if you have lots of workstations that all applied this update.

Log in as your admin profile; Then you delete the c:\users folder for your profile, and then also go in and delete the corresponding registry entry under profiles, then log back in as the user having the start menu issue.  The profile rebuilds/reloads, and the start menu works once again.  Then you just need to recreate the app shortcuts. Details below.

Active Directory, Log in as the domain admin, go to C:\Users and delete the account folder. Then go to regedit.msc and delete the corresponding registry key for the profile. Go Here:
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\ProfileList

Look on the right side window pane of regedit.msc, and find the profile name by clicking through the list, most likely the bottom one. Right click, delete.

Then reboot.  Login as that user, the profile will reload/rebuild.  The start menu will work once again.  However, the apps themselves may need to have their links recreated.  Pause here, and wait and see.  If you have your apps back, there is no need to continue.  If you find that you don't have your office suite, or other apps restored, continue on.

Open PowerShell, run as admin, then copy paste this: (then press enter)
Get-AppXPackage -AllUsers | Foreach {Add-AppxPackage -DisableDevelopmentMode -Register "$($_.InstallLocation)\AppXManifest.xml"}

Once running, this powershell command will rebuild the start menu list of apps.  Once it completes, restart the computer one last time, and log back in.  Everything will be back up and working.

Or, you could skip all of this and simply roll back to a previous version ... but where's the fun in that?

winver
SFC /SCANNOW

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